Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
Jul 7, 2011 1:00pm EDT
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
Jul 3, 2011 6:30pm EDT
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
Jul 5, 2011 5:00pm EDT
against pakistan for the selling in the last couple of weeks -- 50 people killed in afghanistan. what is the situation over there ? >> i don't have anything specific on that issue. i will tell you that our own strategic dialogue at the working level continues with pakistan on a broad range of issues. we have assistant secretary brownfield today or tomorrow continuing our law enforcement and counternarcotics dialogue with pakistan. we continue to work the full range of security and law enforcement and stability issues with pakistan. >> and just to follow up on the same issue, there was a quote that u.s. believe go that i.s.a. was involved in the killing of the pakistani journalist. do you agree with that? >> i'm not going to speak to any intelligence issues obviously from this podium. i will say that when this incident occurred back in may, we issued a very strong statement and i will repeat today that we strongly condemn the abduction and killing of reporters and we have raised our concerns with this case with the pakistanis. >> do you believe this is an act of terrorism, the killing
Jul 9, 2011 8:00pm EDT
, the india-pakistan war, which still defiance in many ways what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career, end of his life, in 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically. to him, the cold war -- the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia. his basic thesis was communism is dead in russia, but democracy has not yet won. for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about the leaders in russia, speaking on the topic. he gets a call from president palin ton. they had a conversation about clinton's russia policy. you can see in the squept months clinton russian policy change along the advice that was given by richard nixon. that is, as i see it, the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's eulogy. he talks about the last time he saw president nixon at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. without a note, president nixon stood and delivered a compelling speech, captures the global scene and sharing his visio
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)